September 2008


I am working with a client on a custom glass backsplash wall. Not tile, but glass panels. We looked and looked for a company that did textured, tempered, colored glass and all along the brochure for Joel Berman Glass was sitting right on ( well, underneath a bunch of junk) my desk! This is very cool glass and I wouldn’t let anyone in my shop even touch the samples when they came in! I wanted them all to myself…at least until I showed the client! They can do most any color and have awesome patterns …sure to find the perfect one for your project. Granted, this is not a budget item…but oh so worth it! This is what keeps me excited and energized about the business. I am a materials person and love finding new products or using typical products in unusual ways.  Check it out!

Glass privacy wall

Glass privacy wall

lobby sculpture

lobby sculpture

Doors

Doors

Panels

Panels

Panel

Panel

This is another article I wrote for PNJ Home and Garden Weekly. Reprinted for those who might have missed it! Let me know your thoughts or if you agree or disagree! Comments always welcome!

Planning a kitchen design, whether a remodel or new construction can be a Herculean task filled with many more decisions than you ever thought possible. To complicate matters, people sometimes buy into myths about kitchen planning that can cost you the look or function you really desire. Here are some common misconceptions on kitchen design and planning.

The dishwasher location: Conventional wisdom says if you are right handed then it belongs on the right side of the sink. Simple,right? Wrong! It can be on either side but most people become used to it on one side or the other and that is just preference. I like to put it where it works best for the design and accessibility to storage. And while on the subject, please disregard the raised dishwasher idea that came and went as fast as platform sneakers. Raising a dishwasher sounds good in theory but think about how silly it would look and function having the counter right next to your sink raised 6 inches or so? Sort of like, hmmm, platform sneakers!

Dishwasher on the left even though client is right handed! Do what works for the layout!

Dishwasher on the left even though client is right handed! Do what works for the layout!

The trash pullout next to the sink: If you are dreaming of a well appointed kitchen, place this nifty feature high on your list of “must haves”. But, don’t be locked into placing it by the sink which is the default location of most designers and architects. Place it where you are doing the most prep work…where you need to swoosh scraps and debris. A bonus is to put it close enough for other people to access it without bothering the cook’s flow of work.

Trash pullout in island and accessible to others not getting into "main" area of the kitchen.

Trash pullout in island and accessible to others not getting into main work area of cook.

Marble counters won’t work: Yes, heavy sigh ,it is more maintenance than some other materials. So is a foreign import car. Does not keep people away from them does it? Marble has been around for centuries and is a classic choice. It is a beautiful, organic and living material than can be used in kitchens or bathrooms .Honed is best for not showing acidic etching and yes, it does need to be resealed periodically. And that is as easy as wiping down your tops after a meal. Don’t be a wimp. If you love it, use it.

Raised bar hides “the kitchen”: If you prefer a raised bar on your island over a single height island, usually this is just personal choice, although some designs work better one way or the other. Just don’t say it is because it hides anything in the sink or on the cooktop. How much can you hide behind 6 inches? Make the decision based on what works for the space not because you think you are fooling anyone into believing your dirty dishes are not really in the sink.

No need to hide this beautiful kitchen from anyone!

No need to hide this beautiful kitchen from anyone!

Break out of the work triangle: Simply, kitchens have evolved into a multi-dimensional aspect of the home. We do not live as we did in the ’50’s when the work triangle was determined to be the arbiter of all good kitchen design. Better, contemplate the ergonomics of how you move about the space. To quote my favorite designer, Johnny Grey, “The working triangle is a very limited and out of date concept”. A point to point path is good common sense but today you are better off thinking of dedicated work areas and targeted storage. Basically, what are you doing and where? And who might be in the space with you?

Flooring: The chicken and the egg debate. What goes in first? The floor or the cabinetry? Put the floor down first in almost every application. There. I said it. Let the feathers fly!. Insist on this if you want a well executed kitchen plan with no transition issues that molding has to try and cover. And, if you are in the middle of a remodel right now and you are keeping existing floors…bet you wished they were underneath your cabinets don’t you?